history
history
history
history
history
history
history
history
history

History
United Arab Emirates

Year
1095
1095
Dubai History

Dubai History The ancient history of Dubai is not accurately recorded, although excavations uncovered the presence of human settlements that date back to approximately 4,000 years. Hundreds of artefacts, housed in Dubai Museum, point to civilisations that inhabited the area between the second and third B.C. Archaeologists have successfully uncovered hundreds of burial sites of different shapes and sizes in Al Qusais. Significant sites in the UAE include the Hatta village site dating back to approximately the third century B.C. whereas Jumeirah is considered by historians to be a familiar landmark in the Islamic history especially in the First Islamic Age. Pottery, Islamic-style decorations and coins have been found. Al Fahidi Fort was built in several phases. The oldest tower was built around 1799 and believed to be the oldest building in Dubai that still exists today. The fort was used to guard the landward approaches to the town. In 1971 and after undergoing maintenance works that lasted for three years, Al Fahidi Fort was transformed into a museum that displays a rich collection of artefacts that create a realistic image of what was day-to-day life really like before the discovery of oil in this region.

Where does the name Dubai come from?

Where does the name Dubai come from? The earliest recorded mention of Dubai is in 1095, in the "Book of Geography" by the Andalusian-Arab geographer Abu Abdullah al-Bakri. The Venetian pearl merchant Gaspero Balbi visited the area in 1580 and mentioned Dubai (Dibei) for its pearling industry. Dubai was referred to as Al Wasl by British historians. Few records pertaining to the cultural history of the UAE or its constituent emirates exist and because of the region's oral traditions, folklore and myth were not written down. According to Fedel Handhal, a researcher in the history and culture of the UAE, the word Dubai may have come from the word Daba. There are several theories as to how Dubai was named. One theory is that the word Dubai is a combination of the Farsi words for two and brothers, the latter referring to Deira and Bur Dubai. Others believe that 'Dubai' was so named by people who considered its souq a smaller version of a thriving market named 'Daba'. Another possibility is that the name came from a word meaning money - people from Dubai were commonly believed to have money because it was a prosperous trading centre.

Old Dubai

Old Dubai In the 18th century, Dubai was a small fishing and trading village inhabited by members of the Bani Yas. The Al Maktoum family settled in Dubai in 1833. As the population grew, Dubai branched into three distinct areas: Deira was the largest and the main commercial centre. On the western bank, Bur Dubai and Shindagha were separated by a wide stretch of sand called Ghubaiba, which would flood during high tide. Shindagha, situated on a narrow strip of land separating the sea from the creek, was the smallest area and the main residential district. The ruling sheikhs traditionally lived here and the late Sheikh Saeed's house is still standing. Shindagha was probably the site of the original Bani Yas village. Crossing the creek meant a long and arduous journey around the end of the creek or a ride in an abra, a small wooden boat that ferries passengers to this day. Abras were also used to transport people to ships. The abras have become a huge tourist attraction. Deira's souk, the town's public market, was lined with narrow, covered passageways. With 350 shops of commodities from around the world, it was the largest market in the region. Many of the craftsman in the souk had no shop, but worked on a vacant piece of ground as close as possible to their clients. They were known by name, and the cry would go round the souk, Where is Hassan the mattress-maker?? until it reached him and he was able to make contact with the potential client. A mattress-maker's creation was vulnerable to visits from passers-by, who might stop to pray on it or simply to rest and chat.? Prior to the introduction of electricity in 1952, kerosene lamps or candles were used for lighting and charcoal, imported from the interior of Oman, was used for cooking and making coffee. Sweet water came from wells around Dubai. The majority of the inhabitants lived in barastis, huts constructed from palm fronds. Extended families dwelled in compounds amid the compounds of relatives. Houses were constructed of gypsum from the salt marshes at the end of the creek and coral stone. The town's highest points were the wind towers of the coral stone houses, the watchtowers and Al Fahidi Fort. Wind towers were used for ventilation -- a house would cool as water on the floor beneath the tower evaporated. Built in 1799, the Fort is Dubai's oldest surviving structure and it has served as the seat of government, the Ruler's residence and as a jail. With a thriving port and market, Dubai's residents enjoyed a higher standard of living than their neighbors in the region.

  
Year
1833
1833
Sheikh Maktoum bin Buti 1833 - 1852

Sheikh Maktoum bin Buti 1833 - 1852 Sheikh Maktoum was very young when he came to power. From the little documented history of Dubai at that time, though, it is clear that he was a courageous, capable leader, who confidently overcame the political and economic challenges he faced whilst establishing the new principality. By the time of his death in 1852, he had become a respected, influential authority on the Trucial Coast.

  
Year
1852
1852
Sheikh Saeed bin Buti 1852 - 1859

Sheikh Saeed bin Buti 1852 - 1859 Following the death of Sheikh Maktoum in 1852, Sheikh Saeed bin Buti Al Maktoum became ruler. He wanted to follow his brother's example of making Dubai a safe haven for all people. To this end, he took the wise decision to form alliances with the Sheikhs of Abu Dhabi and Umm Al Qaiwain, consolidating his ability to face any future disputes. In 1859, Sheikh Saeed bin Buti died of a serious illness after seven years in power.

  
Year
1859
1859
Sheikh Hasher bin Maktoum 1859 - 1886

Sheikh Hasher bin Maktoum 1859 - 1886 Upon the death of Sheikh Saeed bin Butti, in 1859, Sheikh Hasher bin Maktoum Al Maktoum took over the leadership of Dubai. He proved himself to be a brave leader with a strong sense of justice, and was firmly committed to the truces signed by Dubai with the British and the other Trucial Sheikhdoms. Sheikh Hasher died in 1886.

  
Year
1886
1886
Sheikh Rashid bin Maktoum 1886 - 1894

Sheikh Rashid bin Maktoum 1886 - 1894 When Sheikh Hasher passed away, the elders of the tribe elected Sheikh Rashid bin Maktoum as their leader. In 1892, he formed an alliance, through marriage, with the Al Bu Shamis tribe, who were based in Buraimi, a strategically important area at that time, as it was one of the few fertile oases in the country. In the same year, however, he fell ill, eventually dying in 1894.

  
Year
1894
1894
Sheikh Maktoum bin Hasher 1894 - 1906

Sheikh Maktoum bin Hasher 1894 - 1906 Sheikh Maktoum bin Hasher then took power. His economic policy is described in British government papers as "liberal and enlightened"1. He abolished commercial taxes and Dubai's port saw a rapid increase in development and business during his reign. Dubai became a regular stopping point for steamers and established itself as the principal commercial port on the coast. Sheikh Maktoum died in 1906.

  
Year
1906
1906
Sheikh Buti bin Suhail 1906 - 1912

Sheikh Buti bin Suhail 1906 - 1912 Sheikh Maktoum died in 1906. As his sons were too young to take power, he was succeeded by his cousin, Sheikh Buti bin Suhail. Sheikh Buti was already elderly by the time he became Ruler, and his reign lasted only 6 years until his death in 1912, when he was succeeded by Sheikh Saeed bin Maktoum Al Maktoum.

  
Year
1912
1912
Sheikh Saeed bin Maktoum 1912 - 1958

Sheikh Saeed bin Maktoum 1912 - 1958 Sheikh Saeed bin Maktoum Al Maktoum was born in 1878. An unimposing man, Sheikh Saeed began his rule in 1912, a time when the pearling industry was thriving and Dubai was establishing itself as the leading port in the Gulf. He would continue to rule for 46 years until his death in 1958. A deeply religious man, Sheikh Saeed based his decisions on the teachings of Islam. "And he practiced what he preached. An occasion is recalled when he rose early one morning, even before the guards of his modest house in Shindagha, and surprised a foreign craftsman attached to the household in the act of stealing an expensive Persian carpet from the Ruler's majlis. 'Put it back,' Saeed advised the thief. 'The guards will certainly catch you.' The man took Sheikh Saeed's advice, and continued his employment for many years as though nothing had happened."1 Sheikh Saeed was an uncomplicated man who relished the simple pleasures of life. A favorite pastime was the traditional Arab sport, falconry. He would travel to the outskirts of Dubai to where the houbara, his favorite prey, were abundant. As soon as his sons, Sheikh Rashid and Sheikh Khalifa, were able, they would accompany him on his hunting expeditions. In addition to his hunting trips, Sheikh Saeed and his family would retreat from the hustle and bustle of city life to Ras Al Khaimah, a neighboring sheikhdom where the Al Maktoum family owned several date plantations. Free from the pressures of political life, Sheikh Saeed enjoyed the quiet joys of life as a family man. In the 1930's, the pearling industry went into sharp decline. European and American demand for pearls had decreased due to a depressed economy and the creation of cultured pearls in Japan. The world's leading jewelers turned to the Asian market for cultured pearls because they were cheaper than natural pearls and it was possible to mass-produce them. Had it not been for the Ruler's farsightedness in diversifying Dubai's economy and developing the port and the market, Dubai would certainly have suffered greater repercussions. "Both Sheikh Saeed and Sheikh Rashid had long been regarded as the most forward thinking leaders along the Trucial Coast. Dubai was the major trading entrepôt on the Gulf, and despite the recession, its diverse souk retained a level of wealth that was the envy of neighboring sheikhdoms. Over the course of his lifetime, Sheikh Saeed witnessed remarkable transformations in his city-state in terms of the burgeoning population that trebled during his rule and the emergence of a modern city. In addition, the Al Maktoum family consolidated its position as the ruling family of Dubai. Deeply loved and respected by his fellow men, Sheikh Saeed played an invaluable role in establishing the foundation of Dubai.

  
Year
1958
1958
The discovery of oil

The discovery of oil After World War II, Dubai resumed oil excavation operations. Sheikh Rashid, negotiating on behalf of his father, managed to raise the share split between the government and oil exploration companies from 20% to 50%. After failed attempts to discover oil onshore, oil was discovered offshore in what was to be named the ‘Fateh’ offshore oil field in 1966. Officially, oil production stated in 1969 and the first shipment was exported onboard an oil tanker in 22 December of that year. In November 1970, the second offshore oilfield was discovered in which production began in 1972. Sheikh Rashid used the revenues generated from the oil industry to invest in the infrastructure of the emirate. Schools, hospitals and roads were of high importance followed by setting up modern communications and transportation networks. During the reign of Sheikh Rashid, the Dubai International Airport was built to handle all sorts of different aircraft. Plans were also set to build the largest man-made port in the world at Jebel Ali.

Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed 1958 - 1990

Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed 1958 - 1990 Sheikh Rashid, ruler of Dubai from 1958 - 1990, was the eighth ruler from the Al Maktoum family. Well loved and greatly respected by the residents of Dubai, Sheikh Rashid ruled the emirate with compassion and with a clear vision of what was required in order to transform Dubai into a modern city. Driven by this vision, Sheikh Rashid accomplished what many believed to be impossible. As the first-born son of Sheikh Saeed, he involved himself at an early age in the politics of the emirate. He frequently attended his father's Majlis; ever curious, he would listen intently to each man's dilemma or opinion. Eager to comprehend the minutiae of governing a state, he would spend long hours questioning his parents about the events of the day. As a child he received the finest education available in the region. Attending the Al Ahmadiyyah School, Sheikh Rashid's studies included Islamic studies, Arabic, and arithmetic. Although he was a good student, the true focus of his enthusiasm was reserved for falconry and hunting. "From an early age, he was an excellent shot with the rifle and, while his mother took a leading role in his upbringing, falconry was a passion which brought together Sheikh Saeed and Sheikh Rashid, father and son, throughout their lives." These hunting expeditions, which were taken twice a year, led the Ruler and his hunting entourage to Iran and later, on occasion, to Pakistan. Providing Sheikh Rashid with a brief, welcome respite from the responsibilities of his position, he was free to be just a normal man. Houbara, gazelle, rabbit, and grouse were the game of choice. Sheikh Rashid's hands-on approach called for a disciplined daily schedule. Twice daily he would tour Dubai to see for himself how the projects were progressing. Sheikh Rashid was never satisfied with a simple explanation; instead he wanted to have a detailed understanding of every project undertaken in Dubai. Furthermore, these inspections provided him with the opportunity to meet with the man on the street. "After returning home in the evening, it was time to take on more official business in the traditional evening Majlis, an occasion where the Ruler gives his people the opportunity to meet him and share problems or grievances. This duty was one which Sheikh Rashid took very seriously." Sheikh Rashid was famed and admired for his patience on these occasions; he thoughtfully considered each man's complaint or opinion, ensuring that proper assistance was given to each individual. The Majlis, a mix of nationals, also provided a vibrant stage for debate. Surrounded by men whose opinions he valued, projects were dissected, moulded together, and often implemented by members of the Majlis. Determined in his unfaltering belief that a modernized Dubai could be achieved, Sheikh Rashid initiated numerous remarkable developments in his city-state. Projects viewed as impossible by many members of society (including foreign nationals), were seen as challenges by the Ruler. Examples of such projects include the Al Maktoum Hospital, the first modern hospital in what was then the Trucial States; the Al Maktoum Bridge, which spanned the Creek, joining Dubai with Deira and eliminating the long trip around the head of the Creek; and Dubai Airport, which bore immediate reward as demand for seats grew much faster than anticipated. "Both these projects, the airport and the bridge, showed clearly that Dubai infrastructure planning was hardly ever just a response to the immediate needs of the community: it was clearly linked to the ambitious ideas about the future development of Dubai." On October 7, 1990, Sheikh Rashid died. He left behind a legacy visible in the town planning of Dubai. News of his death travelled far and wide. Heads of States throughout the world sent their condolences. "Most extraordinarily, however, was the reaction across the Atlantic in New York, at the United Nations. The General Assembly was debating a motion on Palestine when invited to mark the passing of Dubai's leader. Both General Assembly and Security Council observed a minute's silence, after which representatives of Kuwait, Poland and the US paid tribute to Sheikh Rashid. Though scarcely a whisper marked his birth in 1912 in a place which few outsiders at the time had even heard of, Sheikh Rashid had laboured to develop Dubai and later the United Arab Emirates into a lasting and sustainable entity. Seventy-eight years later, his death drew the world community to its feet in the UN General Assembly, a remarkable tribute to a remarkable man and his undoubtedly remarkable achievements

  
Year
1966
1966
Federal Union between Dubai and Abu Dhabi

Federal Union between Dubai and Abu Dhabi After the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan became the Ruler of Abu Dhabi in 1966, he had a vision of creating a union to catalyse development just as the other developing nations. Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed in Dubai, who was Ruler since 1958, had a similar vision. A shared vision between the two leaders translated into a federal union between Dubai and Abu Dhabi after the historical meeting in Samha – located on the border area between the sister emirates – on 18th February 1968.

  
Year
1971
1971
The founding of the United Arab Emirates

The founding of the United Arab Emirates The Dubai-Abu Dhabi Federal Union opened new doors for the establishment of a wider union driven by the shared vision of both Sheikh Zayed and Sheikh Rashid. Ultimately, and after hard work of communications and negotiations, on 18th July 1971, six of the Trucial States (Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Sharjah, Ajman, Umm Al Quwain and Fujairah) decided to form a state under one banner. On 2nd December 1971, the establishment of the United Arab Emirates was announced. Ras Al Khaimah joined the union on 2nd December 1972 when the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan raised the UAE flag for the first time.

UAE becomes 132nd member of the United Nations

UAE becomes 132nd member of the United Nations As a new state, the United Arab Emirates joined the League of Arab Nations on 6th December 1971 and then became the 132nd country to join the United Nations on 9th December 1971. The UAE was a founding member of the Islamic Conference Organisation in the 1970s. Abu Dhabi, capital of the UAE, hosted a historical meeting in 1981 that saw the establishment of the Gulf Cooperation Council which includes UAE, Oman, Qatar, Bahrain, Kuwait and Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Temporary 1971 constitution approved as permanent in 1996

Temporary 1971 constitution approved as permanent in 1996 Since its establishment in 1971, the UAE adopted a temporary constitution. On 20th May 1996, the Supreme Council approved an amendment that led to the endorsement of the constitution as a permanent constitution of the UAE. The UAE’s constitutionally based federal system of government includes the following institutions: -Supreme Council The top policy-making body in the state is made up of the rulers of each emirate. The Supreme Council reaffirms the existing President or elects a new one at five-yearly intervals. The term of elected office for the Vice-President is also five years and the post is presently held by His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, who was elected following the death of his brother, Sheikh Maktoum bin Rashid Al Maktoum, in early 2006. -Federation President, Vice-President: The late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan was elected as the President of the federation and was unanimously re-elected until his death on 2 November 2004. His Highness Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan was elected president following the sad demise of his father. Back then, the late Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum was elected the first Vice-President of the UAE until his death in 1990. Sheikh Maktoum bin Rashid followed in his footsteps as Vice-President until his sad demise in 2006. His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum was then elected Vice-President. -Council of Ministers (Cabinet) The Council of Ministers constitutes the Prime Minister, his two deputies, the ministers of the UAE. The late Sheikh Maktoum bin Rashid called for the first meeting of the Cabinet on 2nd April 1972 and served as Prime Minister until 1979 when he abdicated in favour of his father Sheikh Rashid. He then returned as Deputy Prime Minister after four years. On 4 January 2006, His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum became the Ruler of Dubai following the death of his brother the late Sheikh Maktoum bin Rashid Al Maktoum. On 5 January 2006, the Supreme Council Members elected His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum as the UAE Vice President. They also agreed on UAE President’s suggestion to appoint His Highness Sheikh Mohammed as Prime Minister. -The Federal National Council The Federal National Council (FNC) has both a legislative and supervisory role, and is a member of the International Parliamentary Union, as well as the Arab Parliamentary Union. Formerly, the 40 members of the FNC, drawn from each of the seven emirates on the basis of their size and population, were appointed by the rulers, but under the present system each ruler selects an electoral college whose members must be at least 100 times the number of FNC members for the emirate (eight each for Abu Dhabi and Dubai, six each for Sharjah and Ras Al Khaimah, and four each for Fujairah, Ajman and Umm Al Quwain). The members of each electoral college then elect half of the FNC members for their emirate, with the remaining half being appointed by the ruler. The first elections under this system were held in December 2006. UAE President His Highness Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan heralded in the first phase of political empowerment by increasing the electoral college to more than 129,000 voters following a historic decision in 2011. -The Federal Judiciary The Federal Judiciary, whose independence is guaranteed by the Constitution, includes the Supreme Court and the Courts of First Instance.

  
Year
1990
1990
His role in establishing the UAE

His role in establishing the UAE British records show that, from the early sixties, Sheikh Maktoum regularly accompanied his father to meetings of the Trucial States Council, a body comprising the Rulers of all seven sheikhdoms. In 1966, Sheikh Zayed became leader of Abu Dhabi; and began to enter into serious negotiations as to the long-term future of the Trucial States. On 16th of January 1968, Britain announced that by 1971 it would withdraw completely from the Gulf, so the governments of Dubai and Abu Dhabi decided to press ahead with the proposed union. Over the six weeks following Britain's announcement, the two sheikhdoms worked on solving outstanding issues between them to reach the basis of the union. This was a time in which Sheikh Rashid relied heavily on his eldest son. The 25-year-old Sheikh Maktoum became one of the leading political figures on the Trucial Coast, travelling repeatedly to Abu Dhabi for consultations with Sheikh Zayed and senior officials of his government. The fact that so much was achieved in just six weeks stands as testimony to the abilities of Sheikh Maktoum. On February 18, 1968, he travelled with his father to a desert site on the Abu Dhabi- Dubai border to witness one of the most remarkable events in the history of the coast, the signing of the union accord between Sheikh Zayed and Sheikh Rashid. This accord formed the nucleus of the future federation. On July 10, 1971, Sheikh Rashid and Sheikh Maktoum received delegations from the six other sheikhdoms at the Trucial States Council. The mediation role Sheikh Maktoum played was, without doubt, a significant factor in the development of the federation. On December 2, 1971, the UAE was formally established. The federation process had seen Sheikh Maktoum emerge as a leader of high standing, and this was reflected by subsequent events.

Sheikh Maktoum bin Rashid 1990 - 2006

Sheikh Maktoum bin Rashid 1990 - 2006 The achievements of the UAE in the past three decades are evidence of the abilities of the people who worked selflessly alongside the first UAE President, His Highness Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan. The achievements of the late Sheikh Maktoum bin Rashid Al Maktoum, UAE Vice President and Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai, marked him as a leader who enjoyed a close bond with his people and shared their dreams. Sheikh Maktoum ruled Dubai between November 1990 and January 2006.

Formative Years

Formative Years His Highness Sheikh Maktoum bin Rashid Al Maktoum was born in 1943, at the large Al Maktoum family home in the Shindagha area of Dubai, which is close to the mouth of Dubai Creek. He was the first son of Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum. His early education consisted of private tuition in mathematics, English, Arabic and Islamic studies, to prepare him for the important role that awaited him. On the 4th of October 1958 a ceremony to mark the formal accession of Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum as Ruler of Dubai was held. Sheikh Maktoum addressed the people of Dubai on behalf of his father, a clear sign of Sheikh Rashid's faith in his eldest son. Throughout the late 1950s and the beginning of the 1960s, Sheikh Rashid and Sheikh Maktoum worked around the clock to realise the dream of developing the emirate. Their projects included Dubai Airport and the construction of Dubai's first hotel, numerous schools and modern residential districts. During the early 1960s, Sheikh Maktoum completed his domestic schooling and his father sent him to pursue his education at one of Britain's leading universities. There, he mixed with boys from different nationalities, many the children of world leaders and politicians.

  
Year
1995
1995
Mohammed bin Rashid, Crown Prince of Dubai

Mohammed bin Rashid, Crown Prince of Dubai On 4th January 1995, Dubai and the UAE awoke to groundbreaking news splashed in banner headlines in Arabic and English that the newspapers. The previous day the Dubai Ruler, Sheikh Maktoum, had signed two decrees that would have dramatic effect on the future of the emirate. One appointed Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid as Crown Prince of Dubai. The second recognised Sheikh Hamdan bin Rashid as Deputy Ruler of the emirate. Sheikh Mohammed later commented: "I do not know if I am a good leader, but I am a leader. And I have a vision. I look to the future, 20, 30 years. I learned that from my father, Sheikh Rashid. He was the true father of Dubai. I follow his example. He would rise early and go alone to watch what was happening on each of his projects. I do the same. I watch. I read faces. I take decisions and I move fast; full throttle."

  
Year
2006
2006
Mohammed bin Rashid; Ruler of Dubai

Mohammed bin Rashid; Ruler of Dubai On 4th January 2006, His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum became the Ruler of Dubai following the death of Sheikh Maktoum bin Rashid Al Maktoum during a visit to Australia. On 5th January the members of the UAE Supreme Council elected Sheikh Mohammed the UAE Vice-President.

Mohammed bin Rashid; UAE Prime Minister

Mohammed bin Rashid; UAE Prime Minister On 11th February, 2006 UAE President His Highness Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan nominated Sheikh Mohammed for the position of UAE Prime Minister; the Supreme Council approved this nomination. Sheikh Mohammed and the members of his Cabinet took their oaths in front of Sheikh Khalifa at Al Bateen Palace in Abu Dhabi.

  
Year
2008
2008
Hamdan bin Mohammed; Crown Prince of Dubai

Hamdan bin Mohammed; Crown Prince of Dubai On Friday, 1st February 2008, the Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE, in his capacity as Ruler of Dubai, His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, issued a decree appointing his son Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, as Crown Prince of Dubai. The decree was effective from the date of issuance. Sheikh Mohammed also issued a decree, naming his brother Sheikh Hamdan bin Rashid Al Maktoum and his son Sheikh Maktoum bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum as Deputy Rulers of Dubai Sheikh Hamdan is Sheikh Mohammed’s second son, and he is well known as ‘Fazza’.

Who knows the next great idea may be your idea!

ajax loader
Suggestion sent successfully
© 2018 H. H. Sheikh Hamdan Bin Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum | All Rights Reserved